New Testament in Hebrew, not Greek!

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New Testament in Hebrew, not Greek!

Postby Caroline » Thu May 02, 2013 6:57 pm

Why do you quote the Greek text of the NT and not the Hebrew? The Greek translation loses much meaning because Hebrew world view is so different. Beginning to believe your site does not acknowledge the Hebrew roots...
Caroline
 

Re: New Testament in Hebrew, not Greek!

Postby admin » Thu May 02, 2013 7:03 pm

Caroline wrote:Why do you quote the Greek text of the NT and not the Hebrew? The Greek translation loses much meaning because Hebrew world view is so different. Beginning to believe your site does not acknowledge the Hebrew roots...


There is some speculation that Matthew's gospel was first written in Hebrew, and the earliest reference to this comes from the historian Eusebius (4th Century AD), though all of the earliest and best-attested extant MSS (manuscripts) of the New Testament were all written in Koine Greek. Moreover, the early "church fathers" quoted the New Testament in Greek, not Hebrew... Theologically, the writing of the New Testament in Greek may be considered providential, for a variety of reasons. First, nearly all educated Jews of that time and location could read Koine Greek, and Yeshua himself lived close to the Hellenized city of Sepphoris (only 3.7 miles north of Nazareth), which was a major Greek cosmopolitan center, complete with an amphitheater, etc. (Herod Antipas chose Sepporis in 4 BC. as the capital of his government). Second, many Jews around the world were Hellenized (i.e., adopted Greek culture) and could readily understand the message of the gospel message as it was proclaimed by the disciples to the entire world. Third, the most ancient translation of the Torah, the Septuagint, was written in Koine Greek, which likewise anticipated the New Testament writings. Fourth, the message of the gospel was always intended for all the nations of the earth, and was foreshadowed at the Garden of Eden itself (Gen. 3:15). Fifth, no reputable scholar of the Scriptures seriously disputes that the original writings of the New Testament were indeed written in Koine Greek, and we even have extant MSS dating back to the first century itself. Moreover, while there have been various attempts to "reconstruct" the Greek text of certain parts of the Gospels by assuming an underlying Hebrew source, no such source has ever been found (in this connection note that the Aramaic Peshitta dates at least 200 years LATER than the Greek texts of the New Testament and in fact is a translation from the Greek [Sebastian P. Brock]). Of course the study of Hebrew is linguistically and logically primary in our studies of Scripture, since it is the root and we need to know the Hebrew to understand the correlative Greek terms, but since we have the Septuagint translation, we are able to semantically correlate the Hebrew and Greek fairly well...

As for teaching the "Hebrew Roots," you'll need to be clear about what you are talking about, Caroline. I clearly use a Hebrew priority when reading the NT, though I am not blind to the facts of history. God Almighty, in His sovereign wisdom and providential will, chose to use Koine Greek (common Greek) to declare the universal message of salvation of Yeshua to all the world - to "to every nation, and kindred, and tongue, and people." Hebrew is prior - logically, linguistically, historically - but that does not mean God didn't use the Greek language to convey his message to all the world. The parochet was rent asunder, and the message of life is for all who believe...
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