Dead Sea Scrolls?

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Dead Sea Scrolls?

Postby Guest » Wed Nov 17, 2010 6:46 pm

One Christian preacher came to our congregation and talked pretty badly about acryphocal books and esoteric writings - including the Dead Sea Scrolls. It seems that the Essenes were a community or Jewish sect unto themselves. But their writings are like nothing that I've ever considered before. I've tried to discuss it a time or two and get totally shut down as some sort of infidel. I get so confused sometimes. The extra books of the Bible which some Christian bible scholars claim are totally fake. But if God cared enough to preserve them, shouldn't we consider them? (saying that last question to myself)
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Re: Dead Sea Scrolls?

Postby admin » Wed Nov 17, 2010 6:49 pm

Guest wrote:One Christian preacher came to our congregation and talked pretty badly about acryphocal books and esoteric writings - including the Dead Sea Scrolls. It seems that the Essenes were a community or Jewish sect unto themselves. But their writings are like nothing that I've ever considered before. I've tried to discuss it a time or two and get totally shut down as some sort of infidel. I get so confused sometimes. The extra books of the Bible which some Christian bible scholars claim are totally fake. But if God cared enough to preserve them, shouldn't we consider them? (saying that last question to myself)


The Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS) are helpful to better understand the Scriptures, though they constitute an isolated "text family" that constituted a library for the Essenes... The genizah should not be thought to supersede the authority of Jewish scribal traditions that predated them, etc.

The wonder of the DSS is that they authenticate the revelation we have as the "Masoretic Text" (i.e., the Hebrew 'Old Testament' as handed down by the Masora, or scribal traditions). There are some minor scribal variations (i.e., a word spelled differently here or there), but the texts of the DSS that correspond to the Aleppo Codex (the oldest Masoretic text we have) prove the reliability of textual transmission among the Jews. In other words, the scrolls are the oldest known surviving copies of Biblical manuscripts in existence, and they demonstrate the careful preservation of the Torah and other writings dating from the time of Yeshua.... As for the "extra-biblical" books (Enoch, Jubilees, Tobit, Sirach, etc.), these were historically regarded not true scripture by the Jewish community, and that tradition was carried on by the early church as well. Yeshua never referred to them either. Shalom
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